Saturday, March 9, 2013

what kind of steel base can i have on my slab top table?


invariably, after the question 'how much does a slab top table cost?', the next question is, 'are there other kinds of table bases i should consider?'  there are.  the legs shown above are our most popular style.  based on a shaker design, below, they are cut (wastefully, i admit), from a slab of 1.5" thick steel on a waterjet, at a local steel fabricators shop.  the process is extremely accurate, but slow going through the thick, solid steel, so the individual cut pieces are expensive even before we grind, polish, drill, tap and assemble them.  they are beautiful though, and extremely rigid, and give the heavy slabs a lighter, sort of 'floating', familiar, yet contemporary look.  click the photos to enlarge them. 
each section consists of the main vertical, a 10" 'wing' for stability and a 2.375 x .375 bar  to tie the whole thing together.  we offer 'natural', top and below, rainbow, a dark browny, bronzy, patina, and black.  these finishes are then top coated to stabilize them.


we can also easily alter their shape as our cnc uses the same programming as the waterjet.  if you can draw it, they can probably cut it.
a flattened version for a smaller table
we also offer fabricated metal bases in a variety of styles.  above and below are our 'trapezoid' bases.  also offered in various finishes, they can be fabricated in any size and can accommodate a design change to allow for a drawer.







with the square or rectangular tubing, we can offer a variety of shapes, including squares and xs, shown below.  these bases can be polished and patinated, or left more or less 'as is', like above, for a sort of industrial look.



the restaurant tables below we re fun.  randomly space 5/8ths rebar was welded between two steel plates, randomly painted and randomly rusted.  given that these were 42" high, tghey were bolted to the wood floor, but shortened to traditional dining table height, i'm sure they would make for an interesting look.

wood and rebar combination
we also use plasma cut tapered legs on some of our dining and console tables.
or, our 'bridges' base could also be adapted somehow to a larger, taller scale table.



then we have the 'wood and steel' combinations ...

the 'nakashima inspired' welded steel bases ...



coffee tables ...


and your imagination .. we're open and happy to discuss your designs, either for a slab top you already own, or for a whole table we can design and build for you.  in general, prices for custom steel bases start around $1000. for the welded tubing designs and go up to $3500. to $4000. for the waterjet cut, thick, 'shaker style' patinated steel bases.



6 comments:

Michle Smith said...

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Craftmaster Furniture

Mebel Jepara said...

Very nice design of your furniture
This is the best reference sources that I was looking for
I hope to get a lot of new ideas from you
Thank you Furniture Jepara

Anonymous said...

How did you finish the walnut slab table (the one above the "Nakashima inspired" welded steel bases" text. The wood is absolutely beautiful. Very nice work. Kind regards, Joe Jerkins

Dorset Custom Furniture said...

hi joe .. typically we finish all our slabs with 3 coats of brushed on poly. we start with two coats of gloss and top cloat with a 'satin' or 'dull rubbed' sheen and sometimes we mix the two sheens for something 'in between'. we are currently using ben moore lenmar brand of poly but any brand you are comfortable will do. occasionally we spray a product called magna max by campbell if we are looking for a 'factory finish' look though it does not impart the 'amber' tone we look for. good luck .. it's all about the wood.

Cindy Dy said...

Thank you for putting an effort to published this article. You've done a great job! Good bless!

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Greg Gimbel said...

You guys do sure a wonderful job on these steel bases. This is something I have wanted to expand into. I am always to busy to take the time to get into it.